Stuff Anna Likes

I'm only a little bit crazy.

yungneako:

sp0iledbabe:

blowmarisol:

highfromsanfrancisco:

Always reblog

10/10 THIS

I actually adore her because I’ve NEVER seen a black person get to be so fucking frank and honest about racial injustice on tv.

She’s real, she’s smart, she’s witty, she’s informed and she’s fucking unapologetic. I’m obsessed.

yes

(Source: vangoghmygod, via metrickulous)

sulagnamisra:

sairobee:

Of all the words of mice and men, the saddest are, “It might have been.”
Steve is half-serious when he tells Bruce that he’s sixty years behind on his reading, but it’s still a surprise when Bruce dumps a small stack of books on his lap two hours later. Steve holds one up, confused — they’re all by the same author. Bruce just smiles and says he thinks Steve’ll like them. They’re about the war. Sort of.
Later, he’ll think that’s a roundabout way to put it. Later, he’ll suspect that they weren’t chosen on their historical or literary merit; that Bruce knew he’d understand what they say about the human heart, and what it means to become unstuck in time.

Kurt Vonnegut yes yes please

sulagnamisra:

sairobee:

Of all the words of mice and men, the saddest are, “It might have been.”

Steve is half-serious when he tells Bruce that he’s sixty years behind on his reading, but it’s still a surprise when Bruce dumps a small stack of books on his lap two hours later. Steve holds one up, confused — they’re all by the same author. Bruce just smiles and says he thinks Steve’ll like them. They’re about the war. Sort of.

Later, he’ll think that’s a roundabout way to put it. Later, he’ll suspect that they weren’t chosen on their historical or literary merit; that Bruce knew he’d understand what they say about the human heart, and what it means to become unstuck in time.

Kurt Vonnegut yes yes please

Guardians of the Galaxy! Squeezing yet sighing

Guardians of the Galaxy was sprightly and cheeky with crackling even affecting character work and a funky soundtrack BUT (and this is barely a spoiler) the finale with A CITY/WORLD/GALAXY IN PERIL is getting very numbing and expected. How many times do I have to see a Gigantic Doom Ship crashing into several skyscrapers?The MCU is unfortunately a huge part of the problem and seeing the fresh and original Snowpiercer before this didn’t help matters. Also, Marvel’s villains (save Loki) are boring and unmemorable

“The problem, it seems, is actually the blinders—the inability to engage meaningfully in the conversation. According to the white fragility model, because white folks have the choice to move through the world not thinking about race very often, our race-thinking muscles atrophy and we (unless we consciously do some hard work thinking about these things) can collapse under the slightest weight when it comes to talking about it. We start to sputter, and get defensive, and become angrily dismissive instead of staying calm and talking it out in a sensible way.”

—   

Brendan Kiley’s piece on the Slog is a really good summarization of the whole Mikado/racist theater situation and the unbelievably problematic response. 

Seattle is a city with a race problem — and white liberals denying it isn’t making it go away. 

It’s like we’ve said before — even if you don’t see it as offensive, that doesn’t mean it didn’t offend someone, thus making it offensive. 

Our motto, with this and all situations like it: Just say you’re sorry and try to learn something, rather than doing mental backflips trying to rationalize why someone else’s offense at your action was the wrong response. 

ALSO — and here is a sentence I never thought I’d ever, ever type — go read the Yelp reviews. For the first time possibly ever in the history of that godforsaken website, they’re actually really insightful. 

(via seattlish)

(via racebending)

lingerlongers:

Throw Back Thursday:

Guerrilla Girls, fighting sexism and racism in the art worlds since 1985! 

* All images are copyright by the artists, Guerrilla Girls. 

Hurray!

(via itsde-lightful)

Why Guys Like Asian Girls

Yellow Fever 101: Yeah, yeah, and yeah.

(Source: youtube.com)

I love this song. Whatevs.

Jessie J, Ariana Grande, Nicki Minaj - Bang Bang (Audio)

(Source: youtube.com)

bloodyredcarpet:

On this day in 1907, a screen legend was born…paying our respects to one of the greatest actresses in the film history, Ruby Catherine Stevens, known to movie lovers the world over as Miss Barbara Stanwyck! (July 16, 1907 - January 20, 1990)

(via deftly)

If you’re a boy writer, it’s a simple rule: you’ve gotta get used to the fact that you suck at writing women and that the worst women writer can write a better man than the best male writer can write a good woman. And it’s just the minimum. Because the thing about the sort of heteronormative masculine privilege, whether it’s in Santo Domingo, or the United States, is you grow up your entire life being told that women aren’t human beings, and that women have no independent subjectivity. And because you grow up with this, it’s this huge surprise when you go to college and realize that, “Oh, women aren’t people who does my shit and fucks me.”

And I think that this a huge challenge for boys, because they want to pretend they can write girls. Every time I’m teaching boys to write, I read their women to them, and I’m like, “Yo, you think this is good writing?” These motherfuckers attack each other over cliche lines but they won’t attack each other over these toxic representations of women that they have inherited… their sexist shorthand, they think that is observation. They think that their sexist distortions are insight. And if you’re in a writing program and you say to a guy that their characters are sexist, this guy, it’s like you said they fucking love Hitler. They will fight tooth and nail because they want to preserve this really vicious sexism in the art because that is what they have been taught.

And I think the first step is to admit that you, because of your privilege, have a very distorted sense of women’s subjectivity. And without an enormous amount of assistance, you’re not even going to get a D. I think with male writers the most that you can hope for is a D with an occasional C thrown in. Where the average women writer, when she writes men, she gets a B right off the bat, because they spent their whole life being taught that men have a subjectivity. In fact, part of the whole feminism revolution was saying, “Me too, motherfuckers.” So women come with it built in because of the society.

It’s the same way when people write about race. If you didn’t grow up being a subaltern person in the United States, you might need help writing about race. Motherfuckers are like ‘I got a black boy friend,’ and their shit sounds like Klan Fiction 101.

The most toxic formulas in our cultures are not pass down in political practice, they’re pass down in mundane narratives. It’s our fiction where the toxic virus of sexism, racism, homophobia, where it passes from one generation to the next, and the average artist will kill you before they remove those poisons. And if you want to be a good artist, it means writing, really, about the world. And when you write cliches, whether they are sexist, racist, homophobic, classist, that is a fucking cliche. And motherfuckers will kill you for their cliches about x, but they want their cliches about their race, class, queerness. They want it in there because they feel lost without it. So for me, this has always been the great challenge.

As a writer, if you’re really trying to write something new, you must figure out, with the help of a community, how can you shed these fucking received formulas. They are received. You didn’t come up with them. And why we need fellow artists is because they help us stay on track. They tell you, “You know what? You’re a bit of a fucking homophobe.” You can’t write about the world with these simplistic distortions. They are cliches. People know art, always, because they are uncomfortable. Art discomforts. The trangressiveness of art has to deal with confronting people with the real. And sexism is a way to avoid the real, avoiding the reality of women. Homophobia is to avoid the real, the reality of queerness. All these things are the way we hide from encountering the real. But art, art is just about that.

—    Junot Diaz speaking at Word Up Bookshop, 2012 (via ofgrammatology)s,

(via racebending)

You'll Never Believe Which Famous Authors Hated Each Other's Writing (INFOGRAPHIC)