Stuff Anna Likes

I'm only a little bit crazy.

“If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also”

—   
Matt 5:39

This specifically refers to a hand striking the side of a person’s face, tells quite a different story when placed in it’s proper historical context. In Jesus’s time, striking someone of a lower class ( a servant) with the back of the hand was used to assert authority and dominance. If the persecuted person “turned the other cheek,” the discipliner was faced with a dilemma. The left hand was used for unclean purposes, so a back-hand strike on the opposite cheek would not be performed. Another alternative would be a slap with the open hand as a challenge or to punch the person, but this was seen as a statement of equality. Thus, by turning the other cheek the persecuted was in effect putting an end to the behavior or if the slapping continued the person would lawfully be deemed equal and have to be released as a servant/slave.   

(via thefullnessofthefaith)

THAT makes a lot more sense, now, thank you. 

(via guardianrock)

I can attest to the original poster’s comments. A few years back I took an intensive seminar on faith-based progressive activism, and we spent an entire unit discussing how many of Jesus’ instructions and stories were performative protests designed to shed light on and ridicule the oppressions of that time period as a way to emphasize the absurdity of the social hierarchy and give people the will and motivation to make changes for a more free and equal society.

For example, the next verse (Matthew 5:40) states “And if anyone wants to sue you and take your shirt, hand over your coat as well.” In that time period, men traditionally wore a shirt and a coat-like garment as their daily wear. To sue someone for their shirt was to put them in their place - suing was generally only performed to take care of outstanding debts, and to be sued for one’s shirt meant that the person was so destitute the only valuable thing they could repay with was their own clothing. However, many cultures at that time (including Hebrew peoples) had prohibitions bordering on taboo against public nudity, so for a sued man to surrender both his shirt and his coat was to turn the system on its head and symbolically state, in a very public forum, that “I have no money with which to repay this person, but they are so insistent on taking advantage of my poverty that I am leaving this hearing buck-ass naked. His greed is the cause of a shameful public spectacle.”

All of a sudden an action of power (suing someone for their shirt) becomes a powerful symbol of subversion and mockery, as the suing patron either accepts the coat (and therefore full responsibility as the cause of the other man’s shameful display) or desperately chases the protester around trying to return his clothes to him, making a fool of himself in front of his peers and the entire gathered community.

Additionally, the next verse (Matthew 5:41; “If anyone forces you to go one mile, go with them two miles.”) was a big middle finger to the Romans who had taken over Judea and were not seen as legitimate authority by the majority of the population there. Roman law stated that a centurion on the march could require a Jew (and possibly other civilians as well, although I don’t remember explicitly) to carry his pack at any time and for any reason for one mile along the road (and because of the importance of the Roman highway system in maintaining rule over the expansive empire, the roads tended to be very well ordered and marked), however hecould not require any service beyond the next mile marker. For a Jewish civilian to carry a centurion’s pack for an entire second mile was a way to subvert the authority of the occupying forces. If the civilian wouldn’t give the pack back at the end of the first mile, the centurion would either have to forcibly take it back or report the civilian to his commanding officer (both of which would result in discipline being taken against the soldier for breaking Roman law) or wait until the civilian volunteered to return the pack, giving the Judean native implicit power over the occupying Roman and completely subverting the power structure of the Empire. Can you imagine how demoralizing that must have been for the highly ordered Roman armies that patrolled the region?

Jesus was a pacifist, but his teachings were in no way passive. There’s a reason he was practically considered a terrorist by the reigning powers, and it wasn’t because he healed the sick and fed the hungry.

(via central-avenue)

(via picturaculminis)

exgynocraticgrrl:

Suheir Hammad: Not Your Erotic, Not Your Exotic

Don’t wanna’ be your exotic/Like some dark, fragile, colorful bird imprisoned, caged in a land foreign to the stretch of her wings/Don’t wanna’ be your exotic. Women everywhere look just like me/Some taller, darker, nice than me but like me just the same/Women everywhere carry my nose on their faces/My name on their spirits.

Don’t seduce yourself with my other-ness/My hair wasn’t put on top my head to entice you into some mysterious, black voodoo/The beat of my lashes against each other ain’t some dark, desert beat/It’s just a blink/Get over it.

Don’t build around me your fetish, fantasy, your lustful profanity to cage me in, clip my wings. Don’t wanna’ be your exotic. Your lovin’ of my beauty ain’t more than funky fornication, plain pink perversion. In fact, nasty necrophilia.

Because my beauty is dead to you/I am dead to you.

Not your harem girl, geisha doll, banana picker, pom-pom girl, pum-pum shorts coffee maker, town-whore, belly dancer, private dancer, La Malinche, Venus Hottentot, laundry girl, your immaculate vessel, emasculating princess/Don’t wanna’ be - not your erotic, not your exotic.


Suheir Hammad is a Palestinian-American poet, author and political activist who was born on October 1973 in Amman, Jordan to Palestinian refugee parents and immigrated with her family to Brooklyn, New York City when she was five years old. Her parents later moved to Staten Island. (x)

(via thisisnotjapan)

yungneako:

sp0iledbabe:

blowmarisol:

highfromsanfrancisco:

Always reblog

10/10 THIS

I actually adore her because I’ve NEVER seen a black person get to be so fucking frank and honest about racial injustice on tv.

She’s real, she’s smart, she’s witty, she’s informed and she’s fucking unapologetic. I’m obsessed.

yes

(Source: vangoghmygod, via metrickulous)

sulagnamisra:

sairobee:

Of all the words of mice and men, the saddest are, “It might have been.”
Steve is half-serious when he tells Bruce that he’s sixty years behind on his reading, but it’s still a surprise when Bruce dumps a small stack of books on his lap two hours later. Steve holds one up, confused — they’re all by the same author. Bruce just smiles and says he thinks Steve’ll like them. They’re about the war. Sort of.
Later, he’ll think that’s a roundabout way to put it. Later, he’ll suspect that they weren’t chosen on their historical or literary merit; that Bruce knew he’d understand what they say about the human heart, and what it means to become unstuck in time.

Kurt Vonnegut yes yes please

sulagnamisra:

sairobee:

Of all the words of mice and men, the saddest are, “It might have been.”

Steve is half-serious when he tells Bruce that he’s sixty years behind on his reading, but it’s still a surprise when Bruce dumps a small stack of books on his lap two hours later. Steve holds one up, confused — they’re all by the same author. Bruce just smiles and says he thinks Steve’ll like them. They’re about the war. Sort of.

Later, he’ll think that’s a roundabout way to put it. Later, he’ll suspect that they weren’t chosen on their historical or literary merit; that Bruce knew he’d understand what they say about the human heart, and what it means to become unstuck in time.

Kurt Vonnegut yes yes please

Guardians of the Galaxy! Squeezing yet sighing

Guardians of the Galaxy was sprightly and cheeky with crackling even affecting character work and a funky soundtrack BUT (and this is barely a spoiler) the finale with A CITY/WORLD/GALAXY IN PERIL is getting very numbing and expected. How many times do I have to see a Gigantic Doom Ship crashing into several skyscrapers?The MCU is unfortunately a huge part of the problem and seeing the fresh and original Snowpiercer before this didn’t help matters. Also, Marvel’s villains (save Loki) are boring and unmemorable

“The problem, it seems, is actually the blinders—the inability to engage meaningfully in the conversation. According to the white fragility model, because white folks have the choice to move through the world not thinking about race very often, our race-thinking muscles atrophy and we (unless we consciously do some hard work thinking about these things) can collapse under the slightest weight when it comes to talking about it. We start to sputter, and get defensive, and become angrily dismissive instead of staying calm and talking it out in a sensible way.”

—   

Brendan Kiley’s piece on the Slog is a really good summarization of the whole Mikado/racist theater situation and the unbelievably problematic response. 

Seattle is a city with a race problem — and white liberals denying it isn’t making it go away. 

It’s like we’ve said before — even if you don’t see it as offensive, that doesn’t mean it didn’t offend someone, thus making it offensive. 

Our motto, with this and all situations like it: Just say you’re sorry and try to learn something, rather than doing mental backflips trying to rationalize why someone else’s offense at your action was the wrong response. 

ALSO — and here is a sentence I never thought I’d ever, ever type — go read the Yelp reviews. For the first time possibly ever in the history of that godforsaken website, they’re actually really insightful. 

(via seattlish)

(via racebending)

lingerlongers:

Throw Back Thursday:

Guerrilla Girls, fighting sexism and racism in the art worlds since 1985! 

* All images are copyright by the artists, Guerrilla Girls. 

Hurray!

(via itsde-lightful)

Why Guys Like Asian Girls

Yellow Fever 101: Yeah, yeah, and yeah.

(Source: youtube.com)

I love this song. Whatevs.

Jessie J, Ariana Grande, Nicki Minaj - Bang Bang (Audio)

(Source: youtube.com)

bloodyredcarpet:

On this day in 1907, a screen legend was born…paying our respects to one of the greatest actresses in the film history, Ruby Catherine Stevens, known to movie lovers the world over as Miss Barbara Stanwyck! (July 16, 1907 - January 20, 1990)

(via deftly)